jordanconductor:

um, no.

#1. he looks like P.T. Barnum…

#2. what’s with the “codpiece”???

(Source: blogthoven)

(Reblogged from jordanconductor)
oni-fukucho:

Yoshitoshi (1839 - 1892) 
Minamoto no Yoriyoshi Striking a Rock with His Bow 
Series; Mirror of Famous Generals of Japan

Mirror of Famous Generals of Japan - Yoshitoshi designed this fantastic series of fifty-one prints of military heroes from 1876 to 1882. These dramatic images of famous warriors created a sensation with the Japanese public. Full of violence and intense emotions, Yoshitoshi’s bold and innovative compositions tackled a historic subject using a modern style. His realism and drafting skill captured the important legacy of these national heroes at a time when Japan was struggling with the aftermath of the Satsuma Rebellion. Classic Yoshitoshi images, these dynamic prints are a great choice for collectors.

Minamoto no Yoriyoshi Striking a Rock with His Bow  - An illustration of Minamoto no Yoriyoshi striking a rock with his bow, bringing forth a stream of fresh water, which became the Kitagamigawa River. According to legend, his troops were suffering during a severe drought in 1054, and the water saved the lives of his army. Dressed in full armor with a quiver of arrows at his back, Yoriyoshi prods the base of a rocky cliff as a small spring of water spurts up. The men behind him fall back in surprise, but the warrior continues his efforts. Wonderful detail in the carefully drawn armor and weapons.

oni-fukucho:

Yoshitoshi (1839 - 1892)
Minamoto no Yoriyoshi Striking a Rock with His Bow
Series; Mirror of Famous Generals of Japan

Mirror of Famous Generals of Japan - Yoshitoshi designed this fantastic series of fifty-one prints of military heroes from 1876 to 1882. These dramatic images of famous warriors created a sensation with the Japanese public. Full of violence and intense emotions, Yoshitoshi’s bold and innovative compositions tackled a historic subject using a modern style. His realism and drafting skill captured the important legacy of these national heroes at a time when Japan was struggling with the aftermath of the Satsuma Rebellion. Classic Yoshitoshi images, these dynamic prints are a great choice for collectors.

Minamoto no Yoriyoshi Striking a Rock with His Bow - An illustration of Minamoto no Yoriyoshi striking a rock with his bow, bringing forth a stream of fresh water, which became the Kitagamigawa River. According to legend, his troops were suffering during a severe drought in 1054, and the water saved the lives of his army. Dressed in full armor with a quiver of arrows at his back, Yoriyoshi prods the base of a rocky cliff as a small spring of water spurts up. The men behind him fall back in surprise, but the warrior continues his efforts. Wonderful detail in the carefully drawn armor and weapons.

(Reblogged from oni-fukucho)
(Reblogged from a-life-of-pitbulls)

Unlock The Mysteries Of The Fibonacci Sequence

(Reblogged from fakescience)

idratherbewiththedogs:

STOLEN DURING B&E NEAR DETROIT/DEARBORN BORDER. PLEASE SHARE!

(Reblogged from idratherbewiththedogs)

blusunday:

superawesomeallie:

Doggie daycare pics. :)

Sweet Allie

(Reblogged from blusunday)

The relevant question is not how much a CEO contributes to the company. That is not how economics works. After all, how much does the firefighter contribute who rescues three kids from a burning house? We don’t pay our hero firefighters multimillion dollar salaries. We pay firefighters on the basis of how much it costs to hire another firefighter who can also do the job.

The question is how much does the CEO contribute compared with the next person in line for the job? Given the experience of large corporations in other countries, there is every reason to believe that there are lots of next people who could do the job as well or better and for much less.

Opinion: Time to rein in grossly overpaid CEOs: Company directors need to be held more accountable (via aljazeeraamerica)

The CEO/Shareholder dynamic allows for great inequality and has sent many jobs overseas and American factories to their demise.

(via liberalsarecool)

(Reblogged from thefollowshipofthering)

kebolehjadian:

The Mermaids Song, Hob. XVIIa:25, from Six Original English Canzonettas, Hob. XVIIa:25-30, by Joseph Haydn, with animated score.

(c) aniMIDIfy @ YouTube. Go subscribe them!

(Reblogged from jordanconductor)